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Full text of "Stout Alumnus, Summer 1971"

^TOUT STATE UNIVERSITY - MEWOMONIE, WISCONSIN 54751 



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If the Stout alumni were asked 
to name a faculty member they 
best remember from their college 
days, many of them would men- 
tion Merle Price. As dean of 
men and later dean of students, 
Price has been a friend, compan- 
ion and leader for countless Stout 
students. He will retire this 
summer after nearly 42 years 
of service at the university. 

In announcing the retirement 
plans, Ealph Iverson, vice-presi- 
dent for student services, des- 
cribed Price as a man who "has 
probably contributed moi^e than 
anyone else to assure student 
welfare would be placed first at 
Stout." Iverson said "He was 
equally effective in his ability to 
woi-k with faculty members and 
was able to bridge the gan be- 
tween faculty and students'." 




Iverson 



Through Price's efforts Stout 
became an early leader in student 
government. He was instrumen- 
tal in forming the university's 
first student senate anxi involving 
students in administration. Price 
was also responsible for opening 
Stout's first student union, 

As both a teacher and an ad- 
ministrator, he has maintained 
a close rapport with students. 
He feels that understanding is 
the key to bridging the genera- 
tion gap. "I think there can be 




a generation gap between people 
20. and 30," he said. "I also think 
there can be very close contact 
between people 20 and 80." He 
pointed out that it is a mistake 
to thmk that age is an important 
factor in communication. "It's a 
matter of understanding and 
taking an interest in other 
people," he said. 

Price has an optimistic f eehng 
for today's young people. "This 
generation is more frank; more 
out in i:he open with their prob- 
lems," he commented. "I think 
they have taught us a good deal," 

Turning to his philosophy on 
student government, Price said, 
"Students are more aware of stu- 
dents' needs than anybody else." 
He explained that by involving 
students in decision-making the 



university becomes better at- 
tuned to student attitudes. "By 
and large if students are given 
the responsibility they will ac- 
cept it," he added. 

A University of Minnesota 
graduate, Price served as piinci- 
pal of Grand Marais High School 
and acted as a teaching assistant 
at Minnesota before coming to 
Stout in 1929. 

He plans to continue to reside 
in Menomonie, where he can 
maintain contact with the uni- 
versity community. "I'm going 
to miss Stout but I'll be close by," 
he said. 

Succeeding Price will be Sam-- 
uel Wood, assistant to the vice- 
president for student services. 
Wood has been at Stout since 
1984. 



A Charge to the Graduates 



During spring commencement 
exercises, Merle Price loas the 
faculty representative in the 
"Charge to the Grachtates." His 
remarks, reprinted heloto, sum- 
marize his message to today's 
youth. 

Well, here we are again, I be- 
lieve that when you first entered 
Stout, I had an opportunity to 
greet you at the opening convo- 
cation. Most of us haven't met 
since; this is one of the results 
of growth, Now we are com- 
mencing: you to start your life's 
work and me to begin a hf e of re- 
tirement. 

In these four years much has 
happened. For one thing, you 
have started your education — 
part of it in a formal way within 
the classroom, but much of it in 
the co-curricular activities and 
in your non-campus life. This 



education will continue through- 
out your lives. I hope that I shall 
continue to learn. 

It has been my privilege to 
have spent a career of a half 
century with youth. I am grate- 
ful to my students, for I believe 
that in many ways they have 
given me far more than I have 
been able to return to them. May 
I ask you to accept mY thanks 
on behalf of all of them. 

In the very short time that I 
shall talk with you now, I would 
suggest two concepts that may 
help us as we look ahead, 

The first of these ideas was ex- 
pressed by Norman Cousins 
when he said, "Even the future 
isn't what it used to be," The 
accepted order of the world to 
which I was born was abruptly 
and violently altered by the First 
World War and by the drastic 



Stout AkxmnilS 



Page 8 



"The years ahead 
are certain to 
bring further 
dramatic change" 



and widespread reorganization 
that followed. One month after 
I came to Stout the country was 
plunged into the depression of 
the 30's and we didn't pull out of 
that until the Second World War. 
We emerged from that war bat- 
tered and spent and wondering 
what had been won. In the inter- 
vening years the world has not 
been able to establish peace. So 
I suppose that a characteristic 
of our world is that of change — - 
sometimes evolutionai-yj some- 
times revolutionary, and often 
paradoxical, I think of emerging 
nationalism simultaneous with 
increased efforts at internation- 
alism ; of poverty coexisting with 
tremendously increased national 
wealth; of inadequate housing 
in a time of greatly increased 
materials and improved methods 
of construction ; of a world liter- 
ally smothering itself in the re- 
fuse of its own affluence; of a 
civilization possessing the means 
for its own destruction. 

The years ahead are certain to 
bring further dramatic change 
in such areas as the development 
and use of atomic energy, in the 
development of the space age, in 
the vital areas of ecology, in the 
controls of population and per- 
haps a redistribution of popula- 
tion, and in the continuing search 
for additional supplies of food 
and raw materials. This concept 
of change, then, is one which we 
must all accept. It is strange to 
realize that in large part these 
changes may be caused by a man 
or woman of whom we have not 
yet heard, living in an area of 
this globe of which we are only 
vaguely aware. 

The second concept that I 
would suggest is the antithesis 



of change. It is the idea of con- 
stants. To be sure these con- 
stants may be restated in terms 
of new learning and therefore 
involve new understandings. I 
read only recently of new under- 
standings developed by the geo- 
physicist concerning the ocean 
bed which is now thought to be 
in a state of constant movement 
pulling continents in the wake of 
its modifications. And I read, 
too, an expansion "big bang" 
theory of the origins of the world 
and, indeed, of our universe. One 
of the theoi-ies advanced was 
that further knowledge might 
lead to a new learning of physical 
laws existing in reverse. I would 
not attempt to suggest the mean- 
ing of this statement. We must 
also be precise in our statement 
of facts. The idea that one and 
one make two is meaningless 
until we have defined the units, 
for one and one may not make 
two of anything. One cow plus 
one pig make only hash. 

But in spite of these elements, 
there are constants even when 
considered relatively, No legisla- 
tive body, for example, has yet 
repealed the law of gravity. And 
this is a fact for which the as- 
tronauts are thankful. When 
they leave the moon dependent 
upon the knowledge that they 
have of scientific law, they don't 
want to depend on variables. 
This area of scientific laws could 
be expanded indefinitely. I would 
suggest that we consider also the 
possibility or probability that 
there are constants in the moral 
laws, not conceived of theologi- 
cally but as the summation of 
man's expex'ience whereby he 
finds that certain patterns of be- 
havior bring unpredictable re- 
sults. This is not to say that the 
institutions that society has 
created to maintain and advance 
its values are necessarily infalli- 
ble. It is quite possible that 
some of these institutions need 
comprehensive re-evaluation and, 
in some cases, restructuring. 
Still, there is the danger of con- 
fusing change and progress. 

Certainly we have only started 
a very feeble beginning of know- 
ing the laws of society, of econo- 
mics, of government. But we 
have advanced far enough to 
sense an underlying body of con- 
stants. 



In the field of education these 
concepts of change and of con- 
tinuing patterns may be identi- 
fied. We are not certain of what 
the future of American education 
will be. We are questioning as 
to whether it will be more or less 
formal. We are wondering if it 
will start earlier or continue lon- 
ger — • if the work experience of 
our youth will start at an earher 
age, thus encouraging more com- 
plete independence in the late 
teens or early twenties with edu- 
cation continuing as a coordinate 
or being deferred until a later 
period. We are not certain of the 
future of leisure. We are begin- 
ning to wonder if in some in- 
stances this is not a creation of 
fiction more than of fact. Lei- 
sure, for example, is not desir- 
able if it is the consequence of 
unemployment. Yet, I suspect 
that in the midst of all this 
change, which at times will be 
bewildering in its complexity, we 
will find that there is a place for 
formal education, not totally dif- 
ferent from that that we have 
known — that some of our un- 
derstandings of learning have 
not become antiquated, but this 
will be considered in a g;reatly 
increased body of knowledge. 

These two concepts are not in- 
tended to assure you of any com- 
fort, but I think they are ideas 
that we must consider because 
of the impact they will have on 
your future. I am confident of 
your abihty to live with these 
concepts and I wish you Gods 
speed as you start out. 




Page 4 



Stout Alnmnus 



Stout 

Students 

Take Charge 



students at Stout had the op- 
portunity to take charge of their 
own education the week preced- 
ing Easter vacation, and at the 
same time, learn something 
about other people. The program 
was called Human Encounter 
Week. 

Although it was a part of the 
regular school year, classes were 
closed down to permit students 
to pursue projects of interest to 
them. Hundreds of projects were 
registered at a central clearing- 
house on campus, and although 
participation in the week was 
voluntary, over 80 percent of the 
students indicated they were en- 
gaging in some type of activity 
which they felt was worthwhile. 

Laboratories and classrooms 
were"'- open for students who 
wanted to use facilities on camp- 
us. Others traveled off campus 
for their projects. One group 
of students toured New York's 
fashion industry. Another group 
went to Appalachia to work with 
poverty famihes. 

Many students toured other 
education facihties or studied 
industries connected with their 
major. 

Some of those who stayed on 
campus participated in discus- 
sion groups, made a motion pic- 
ture film, built a small airplane 



and assembled muzzle loaded 
rifles in one of the university's 
machine shops. 

Milwaukee senior John Eade- 
macher, one of the students who 
helped organize the week, pointed 
out that Human Encounter Week 
was an attempt to allow students 
to learn things without close 
supervision. "\^Tien a person 
goes out into the business world 
he's not going to be confronted 
with a teacher telHng him what 
he should learn," Rademacher 
said. "He is going to have to 
learn on his own," 

Undex'lying the independent 
learning process was still another 
goal for the week : people learn- 
ing to understand other people. 
Gene Flug, special assistant to 
the president, said that no mat- 
ter what project a student chose, 
he was expected to have "mean- 
ingful encounters" with other 
people. "We hope this week will 
help all students and staff at this 
institution to understand the im- 
portance of human relationships 
in everything they do," Flug 
said. 

The university placed no re- 
striction on how a student should 
spend the week. "It was up to 
the individual student to decide 
what type of project is meaning- 
ful," Rademacher stated. 



One of the projeots for 
Human Encounter Week in- 
volved the oonstruotion of this 
geodesic dome from cmdboard 
boxes. Purpose of the project 
was to show hovj boxes own be 
reused as an antipollut'.on 
device. The dome' was 
laminated for strength and 
tvill later be donated to a 
children's playground. 




stout Alumnus 



Page 5 



''Specialist'' Degree 
Nears Approval 

Plans for a post-Master's De- 
gree in Counseling and Guidance 
are nearing reality at Stout with 
the selection of a director for the 
program. Carlyle Gilbertson, as- 
sociate professor of counseling 
and personnel services, has been 
named to the post, according to 
Robert Swanson, dean of the 
Graduate College. 

Swanson said the Education 
Specialist Degree (Ed.S.) in 
Counseling and Guidance could 
be offered as early as this fall, 
pending approval by the North 
Central Association of Colleges 
and Schools. Tentative applica- 
tions for the pi-ogram are now 
being accepted. The Board of 
Regents and the Coordinating 
Council for Higher Education 
have already granted approval. 

Commenting on the degree, 
Gilbertson said, "There is a con- 
siderable amount of interest in 
this program by counselors in 
the field." He explained that the 
growing profession is placing in- 
creased emphasis on advanced , 
degrees such as the Ed.S., an in- 
termediary between a master's 
degree and the doctorate. 

Stout has offered a master's 
degree in counseling since 1959, 
with about 200 persons now en- 
rolled in the program. It will be 
the first state university to offer 
a post-master's degree in guid- 
ance. 






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The years of service the late Robert L. Pierce gave to Stout are re- 
membered in a plaque placed at the east entrance of the netv addition 
to the Pierce Library. Prior to its installation, the plaqtte %oas vietoed 
by Mrs. Pierce and her daughter, Mrs. William Black, Manlcato, Minn. 
The neio library addition completed in late 1969 tripled the size of the 
library. 






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Stout's ne^o $4.2 million Science and Technology address by William L. Ramsey, director of the Mil- 
Btdlding was formally dedicated May 1. Ceremonies loaukee Area Technical College, 
included tours of the btnlding and the dedication 



Page 6 



Stout Alumnus 









Classical cookery was combined with 
traditional American dining, April 29, for 
an elaborate 13-course dinner served by 
hotel and restaurant management students 
at Stout. 

Billed as "An American Fare," the five 
hour affair was conducted as part of a 
haute cuisine class, a course dealing with 
fine cookery. 

Reminiscent of graceful 17th century 
European dining, the meal was prepared 
entirely from American products. Each 
dish was an original, created by the 29 stu- 
■ dents in the haute cuisine class and their 
instructor. 

A limited group of 54 persons paid $25' 
a couple to attend the strictly formal af- 
fair. John Bryson, instructor in the haute 
cuisine course, said that a dinner such as 
this would ordinarily cost $100 per person, 
but because this was a class project wiih 
many services and facilities donated, the 
price was relatively low. 

Wine for the entire evening was donated 
by a New York State winery. Because the 
dinner was connected with a class, special 
permission to serve wine on campus that 
evening was granted from the Board of 
Regents. 

The evening began at 5:30 with an 
"American Hour" during which two kinds 
of champagne and over 400 different varie- 
ties of canopies were served. 

Dishes on the menu had names such 
as North Dakota Consume, Wall Street 
Steak and Strawberries Keuka. Eight 
courses of wine were served during the 
meal. 



Bryson noted that the American fare 
was chosen in order to allow students to 
devise pew dishes that reflect the tradi- 
tions of classical cookery. He said he 
wanted something that was "uniquely 
American, other than the hamburger and 
hot dog." 

He also said that the dinner was in- 
tended to "teach the students self -discipline 
and service and to show how well people 
can be treated." All aspects of the dinner 
were handled by students. 

According to Bryson, dinners such as 
this were commonplace three conturio'^ atm, 
when statesmen used food a.s ;i ]j(".li1i(;U 
tool to win favor. "Napoleon ;uij h<' vnu 
more battles at the table than on I hr Ijat.i Ic- 
field," he commented. 








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stout Alumnus 



Page 7 



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stout Alumnns 




COMMENTS 



"There is a young man work- 
ing in my plant who has a lot of 
potential for advancement. I 
would like to encourage him to 
enroll at Stout, what should I 
do ?" . . . reads one letter, 

Another letter: "A student 
of mme would like to look into 
the possibility of attending Stout 
next fall to become a Home Econ- 
omics teacher. How do I help 
her?" 

Or this : "This boy can really 
carry a football. How can I get 
Stout to take a look at him ?''' 

Questions from Stout alumni. 
Questions that show several 
ways alumni can recruit students 
for Stout. Questions that tell us 
it's time to tell you how your 
alumni office can help you re- 
cruit prospective students. 

It's easy! All you have to do 
is write to me. Tell me as much 
as you can: like the prospective 
student's name, home address, 
career interest, school status, 
your relationship, etc. We wiU 
take it from there. I would hope 
that you would encourage the 
person to attend Stout and offer 
to help in any way you can. But 
the important thing for you to 
know is that all you have to do 
is write to me in the alumni of- 
fice and I will see that the right 
person contacts your prospective 
student. 

While it helps to know that a 
person already has an interest 
m attending Stout, this does not 
necessarily have to be the case 
before you contact me. Maybe 
your prospect never heard of 
Stout, but you think Stout is the 
place for him to go. Well, tell 
us about him ! 

Most of the initial contacts for 
Stout will be made by our Direc- 
tor of School Relations, Mr 
Charles Kell. Chariie will pro- 
i^ide information, explain applica- 
tion procedures, and offer his as- 
sistance. He will send your pro- 




BY JACK WILE 

EXECUTIVE 
SECRETARY 



spect a booklet that describes 
Stout's majors, housing, financial 
aids, campus life, etc. If the 
prospect is an athlete, Charlie 
will see that the appropriate phy- 
sical educaton staff is involved. 
Charlie tells me that the major 
reason students choose Stout is 
because of a specific curriculum. 
He also says that the typical 
Stout student has a pretty good 
idea of what he or she wants to 
do after graduation. So if your 
prospective student seems to be 
or ought to be heading in a 
specific direction, -Stout's tradi- 
tional mission of preparing stu- 
dents for careers should have a 
special appeal. 

The number of potential car- 
eers for Stout graduates is im- 
pressive. For instance, our 
School of Home Economics bro- 
chure lists over 100 possible car- 
eers available to students choos- 
ing that field including such 
varied possibilities as a 4-H 
leader, home economics teacher, 
hotel manager, interior decora- 
tor, space food technologist, 
family Hfe consultant, and foods 
editor. 

Other Stout schools add innu- 
merable opportunities ; industrial 
arts teacher, packaging engi- 
neer, director of computer serv- 
ices, vocational evaluator, safety 
director, production control sup- 
ervisor, driver education teacher, 
vocational school teacher, audio- 
visual coordinator, and guidance 
counselor are just a few of the 
hundreds of career possibilities 
available through Stout's 22 un- 
dergraduate and 11 graduate 
majors. 

We at Stout can help in many 
ways. But the person-to-person 
contact that you can provide is 
extremely important. There is 
no substitute for friendly, per- 
sonal counseling from someone 
who has "been there". Good 
luck! 



Faculty Members 
Begin Retirement 

Two long-time faculty mem- 
bers at Stout retired this sum- 
mer. They are Otto W. Nitz, 
chairman of the chemistry de- 
partment; and Phylhs Bentley, 
director of the university library, 

Nitz has devoted 19 years to 
the university, during which he 
was responsible for the chemis- 







Bentley 



Nitz 



try program. He has made many 
contributions to the educational 
programs at the university, in- 
cluding the publication of sever- 
al textbooks and many articles 
m professional journals. He also 
played a key role in the design 
of 'Stout's new science and tech- 
nology building. 

Miss Bentley, who has been 
on the Stout campus for 17 years, 
has been responsible for the ex- 
pansion of the university's li- 
brary facilities to meet the 
school's rapid development. She 
was instrumental in the expan- 
sion of the Robert L. Pierce Li- 
brary which more than doubled 
its original size. 

Miss Bentley received her 
Bachelor of Arts degree from 
the University of Wisconsin; a 
diploma from the University of 
Minnesota; and a Master of 
Science degree from Columbia 
University, New York City. 

She has devoted over 48 years 
to library science in both private 
and public institutions, 

Nitz received his Bachelor of 
Science degree from Elmhurst 
College, Elmhurst, IE,; and his 
Master's degree and Ph,D, from 
the University of Iowa, Iowa 
City. 

He has taught at Elmhurst; 
Parson's College, Fairfield, Iowa; 
and Northern Montana College, 
Havre. He also worked for Ken- 
tucky Synthetic Rubber Co., 
where he was chief chemist. 



stout Alumnus 



Page 9 



Little Devils 

'56 

A third daughtei', Penny, Dec. 14, 
1970, to MARLON J. and RAMONA 
L. STEWART SCHARF (BS 57), 
Route No, 1, Bangor, Mich. He is head 
of the industrial arts department at 
Bangor High School. 

'57 

A second daughter, Betsy Eae, Jan. 
6, to Norman J. and MARY ELLEN 
RICH FRENZEL (MS 59), 720 Ster- 
ling Ave,, Oshkosh. 

'59 

A third child, Carla, Dec, 19, 1970, 
to Charles and MARLYS PETTIS 
SCHNEIDER, P.O. Box 212, Alexan- 
dria, Minn. She plans to do substitute 
teaching. 

Stout Alumni 
Groups Elect 
New Officers 

New officers were recently- 
elected for two Stout Alumni 
chapters during' annual associa- 
tion banquets. 

In -the Detroit area Stanley 
tobin ('56) was chosen presi- 
dent; Don Zittleman (BS '55, 
MS '56), vice-president; Mrs. 
Kendall Fi'ost (Jean Bulmer '51) , 
secretary; and John Pagels ('63), 
treasurer. 

Phil Ruehl (BS '41, MS '48), 
assistaiat dean of the School of 
Applied Science and Technology 
at Stout, attended the banquet 
as a representative of the uni- 
versity. Ruehl showed recent 
slides of the campus and com-' 
munity and described the- cjhang- 
es that are currently taking place 
on the campus. 

Richard Anderson, dean of ad- 
missions and records, repre- 
sented Stout at the annual ban- 
quet of the Rock River Vahey 
Stout State University Alumni 
Association in Beloit. Anderson 
shpwed'slides and brought alum- 
ni up-to-date on the changes at 
Stout. 

Newly elected officers were: 
Mrs. Charles Mowbray (Carolyn 
Blain '51), Janesville, president; 
Gerald Stauffacher ('61) , White- 
water, vice-president; and Mrs. 
Arnold Meier (Harriet Hinrich 
'62), Rockford, 111,, secretary- 
treasurer. 

The group also voted to con- 
tribute $50 to the Alumni Scho- 
larship Fund in the Stout Foun- 
dation. 



'60 

A second child, Kathy, Nov., 1970, 
to Mr. and Mrs. DON TEST, 524 Park 
Ave., Wilmette, 111. He is the coopera- 
tive vocational education coordinator 
at the Niles Township High School. 

'62 

A third daughter, Sandra Lynn, Jan. 
5, to Mr. and Mrs, STANLEY BAD- 
ZINSKI, JR., 2107 W. Barnard Ave., 
Milwaukee. He is an architectural 
technology and carpentry instructor 
at the Milwaukee Area Technical Col- 
lege. 

'63 

A second son, Jonathan David, Nov. 
11, 1970, to DONALD E. and JUDITH 
M. BERGEN LARKIN, 16 Vista Ave,, 
Lynchburg, Va. He is a sales repre- 
sentative with the Old Dominion Box 
Co., Folding' Carton Div. 

'64 

A son, Steven Glenn, Jan. 7, to Mr, 
and Mrs. CHARLES LOHR, 2831 
Kiska Ave,, Hacienda Heights, Calif. 
He is a graphic arts teacher at Work- 
man High School in La Puente, Calif. 

A daughtei-, Stacy Charlene, Dec. 
21, 1970, to Mr. and Mrs. HARVEY 
D. HARMS, Box 71, Chugrak, Alaska. 
He is an industrial arts instructor at 
Chugrak High School. 

A daughter, Gabrielle Marie, Dec. 
2, 1970, to Gail and ANNAMARIE 
SIHSMANN HERNDON, 1341 E. 89th 
St,, Chicago, 111. She is the education 
coordinator and is also involved in 
dietetic research at Michael Reese 
Hospital and Medical Center. 

'65 

A daughter, Carrie Louise, Jan. 5, 
to JAMES M. and NANCY PERKINS 
NAYLOR, 1216 26th Ave., Rock Is- 
land, 111. He is director of career 
orientation at the Rock Island public 
schools. 

A son, Dec. 21, 1970, to Mr. and Mrs, 
DALE ANDERSON, 2055 Bradley 
St., St. Paul. He is a manufacturing 
engineer with the Control Data Corp. 

A son, Michael Arthur, Sept. 13, 
1970, to Mr. and Mrs. ARTHUR P. 
SCHNELL (MS 70), 3725 So. 15th St., 
Sheboygan. He teaches graphic arts 
at Sheboygan public schools. 

A son, Clark Russell, Dec. 1, 1970, 
to JERRY R. (MS 68) and DIANE L. 
WENZLER BARTON (MS 69), Box 
224, Cassville. He teaches general 
shop at the Cassville High School. 

A second son, Jason Andrew, Dec, 
24, 1970, to Joseph C. and JANICE 
KAY PACKARD JANC, 609 Miles St., 
Chippewa Falls. She is a clinical 
dietitian in charge of all therapuetic 
diets at the Northern Wisconsin Col- 
ony and Training School. 

An adopted son, Scott David, Sept. 
12, 1970, by DAVID and JUDY ROD- 
GER FEDLER (BS 65), 1950 Blue- 
berry Lane, Green Bay. He is a 
methods engineer with Hudson Sharp- 
PMC. 

'66 

A second davighter. Amy Joy, Nov. 
3, 1970, to DAVID W. (MS 69) and 
JUDITH A. FULLER SMITH (BS 
66), 23370 Blazer Court, New Boston, 
Mich, He is a metals instructor at 
Huron High School, New Boston, 



A second child, Dawn Marie, Nov, 
5, 1970, to WAYNE A. and CARO- 
LYN A. SYNNOTT NELSON, Box 
207, Goodhue, Minn. He teaches in- 
dustrial arts at Independent School 
District 268 in Goodhxie. 

A son, Steven James, Jan. 15, to 
DONALD and JEANETTE EMER- 
SON RANTALA (BS 67), Roiite No. 
2, Shady Hill Court, Clinton. He is 
director of audio-visual and industrial 
arts teacher at Clinton Community 
Schools. 

A daughter, Jennifer, Sept. 22, 1970, 
to Navy Lt. and Mrs. RONALD F. 
BOYER, 1076B Glacier Court, Oak 
Harbor,^ Wash. Lt. Boyer operates the 
navigation and bombing systems in 
a twin jet. He has served two tours 
in Vietnam, 

'67 

A son, Chad Michael, Dec. 29, 1970, 
to Mr, and Mrs. RICHARD G. ROW- 
LEY, 16019 Temple Dr., Minnetonka, 
Minn. Besides being a coach, he also 
teaches industrial arts at Hopkins 
School Distx-ict No, 274, Hopkins, 
Minn. 

A daughter, Deborah AUyson, Nov, 
9, 1970, to Mr, and Mrs. STEPHEN 
WELLS BURKE, 602 Congress, Ypsi- 
lanti, Mich. He teaches industrial 
education in the Milan area schools, 
Milan, Mich. 

'68 

A son, Darin Glen, Sept, 29, 1970, 
to Mr. and Mrs. GLEN JENSEN, 1210 
W, Lincoln Blvd,, Freeport, 111, He is 
an engineering technologist with the 
Micro Switch Division of Honeywell, 
Inc. 

A daughter, Nov. 5, 1970, to Thomas 
and BETTE 0. OYAiMA NOMURA, 
552 Pohai St., Kahului, Maw, Hawaii. 
She is a home economics and art 
teacher. 

A second son, Brett Allen, Sept. 18, 
1970, to Mr. and Mrs. DENNIS L. 
CAIRNS, 1635 Mt. Vernon, Oshkosh. 
He is an automotive instructor at the 
Fox Valley Technicial Institute, Osh- 
kosh. 

'69 

A daughter, Margaret Ann, Nov. 
12, 1970, to Mr. and Mrs. PAUL 
SUPBAK of Racine, He is a court 
reporter in the U.S. Army, stationed 
in Vietnam. 

A son, Steven James, Sept. 4, 1970, 
to Mr. and Mrs. STAN GRACYALNY, 
1152 S. Washington Ave,, Cedarburg, 
He is a graphic arts instructor at 
Homestead High School, Mequon, 

A second daughter, Janine Annetts, 
Dec, 26, 1970, to Mr, and Mrs. JOHN 
C. LUECK, Route No. 1, Fontana. He 
teaches metals and automotive me- 
chanics at the Big Foot High School, 
Walworth. 

'70 

A son, Ryan Kristofor, Dec. 28, 1970, 
to Dean R, Peterson and LINDA K. 
KNUTSON PETERSON, P.O. Box 
673, Baldwin. 

'71 

A daughter, Cami Leanne, Dec. 8, 
1970, to JEFFREY and SANDRA 
BENHAM BROWN (BS 70), 3017 N. 
9th, Sheboygan. He is a printing in- 
structor at the Rehabilitation Center 
of Sheboygan, Inc. 



Page 10 



Stout Alumnus 



Class Notes 



13 

Retirement is the time to pursue 
hobbies. When SYLVIA SHIRAS re- 
tired from her job as home economics 
agent for Trempealeau County in 
Whitehall 12 years ago, she purchased 
a loom and in retirement she weaves. 
She has created many tapestries, mats 
and decorative designs, but her big- 
gest achievements have been in mak- 
ing yard goods for new tapestry. 

'23 

After 17 years as state director of 
school i^lant planning with the Min- 
nesota State Department of Educa- 
tion, GUY O. TOLLERUD of St. Paul, 
retired in early April. His career in 
education also consisted of 17 years 
as a teacher and over 10 years in 
supervisory roles. Tollerud's exper- 
ience outside of education includes 
auto mechanics, carpentry, contract- 
ing, citrus fruit raising and even gold 
mining. 

'33 

After 23 years with the California 
State Department of Corrections, 
L. G. WINES (MS 40), of Cambria, 
Calif., retired May 28. The last nine 
years he served as supervisor of edu- 
cation at the California Rehabilita- 
tion Center (Narcotic Addict Treat- 
ment Center). 

'36 

After serving more than 35 years 
in education, H. J. VAN VALKEN- 
BURG (MS 49), 319 Amory St., Fond 
du Lac, will retire July 1 as director 
of Vocational, Technical and Adult 
Education District 10. His immediate 
plans- after retirement are to spend 
some time at his summer cottage 
before entering some new line of en- 
deavor. 

VIOLA LARSON BENG-TSON 
writes that they travel to Europe 
every summer. Most of their vaca- 
tion is spent in a rented mountain 
"saeter" in Norway where they seek 
rest and a complete change of en- 
vironment compared to their busy life 
in Minneapolis. 

'43 

Martha Mary Kirkby, daughter of 
Mr. and MRS. EVANS KIRKBY 4246 
N, 25fch St., Milwaukee, received a 
$500 educational grant as state run- 
nerup in Wisconsin's 1971 Betty 
Crocker Homemaker of Tomoirow 
competition. She is also the grand- 
daughter of MRS. CHARLES COVIN 
(05), one of Stout's oldest graduates. 

'44 

GEORGE SODERBERG, 1020 13th 
St., Menomonie, professor of wood 
technics at Stout, is recovering from 
a heart attack which he suffered in 
late January. 

GREGORY TRZEBIATOWSKI has 

recently been named assistant dean 



for educational development at Ohio 
State University, Columbus. An ed- 
ucator for many years, he still re- 
mains associate professor on the fac- 
ulty there, 

'65 

MRS. HAVEN (BONNIE) WILL- 
IAMS, 702 Thundexbird Lane, Wausau, 
has been named extension home econ- 
omist for Marathon County. She as- 
sumed her new position April 1. 

JOAN EMILY HERWIG received 
her master's degree Feb, 27 at Iowa 
State University, Ames. 

'67 

Upon completion of a three-year 
tour with the U.S. Marine Corps, 
HENRY J. KREIBACH is a substi- 
tute industrial arts teacher at Pesh- 
tigo High School. He resides with 
his wife and two children at 171 N. 
Elis, Peshtigo. 



Airman ROGER E. PELKEY of 

Milwaukee has graduated at Chanute 
APE, 111,, from the technical training 
course for Air Force vehicle repair- 
men. He is remaining at Chanute for 
duty as an instructor with a unit of 
the Air Training Command. 

U.S. Air Force Sergeant NORBERT 
J. DALEIDEN of Maiden Rook is on 
duty at Tan Son Nhut AB, Vietnam, 
where he is a maintenance analysis 
specialist. 

U.S. Air Force First Lieutenant 
JACKIE L. TONN of Neenah has re- 
ceived the air medal at Bien Hoa AB, 
Vietnam, for air action in Southeast 
Asia, 

A new era has opened at Tomah 
Senior High School with the hiring of 
Tomah District's first vocational ed- 
ucation coordinator. He is WILLIAM 
ZABOROWSKI (MS 71), who assumed 
his new duties Jan. 25. 

'69 

Private First Class LEE A. BUVID 
of Two Rivers is involved with sol- 
diers beginning their tours in Viet- 
nam and those departing the country. 
He is assigned as a clerk in the 
Permanent Party of Headquarters 
Detachment, 22nd Replacement Bat- 
talion, near Cam Ranh Bay, and has 



THE STOUT ALUMNUS 

The Stout Alumnus is the 
official publication of the 
Alumni Association of Stout 
State University, Menomonie, 
Wis. It is published quai'terly 
and entered at the post office 
at Menomonie, Wis., as third 
class matter. 

Joseph D. Koch, President 

Robert Erickson, Vice-Pres. 

Jack Wile, Executive Sec. 

John K, Enger, Editor 

Judy Olson, 

Ass't, to the Editor 

John Williams, Photos 



been trained to assist the new re- 
placements and outgoing soldiers by 
trying to eliminate all unnecessary 
delays and details in their processing. 

'70 

Many people lack an adequate diet 
simply because they lack the know- 
ledge to use the resources available 
to them. Reaching these people is 
the basic reason for the recently or- 
ganized Expanded Food and Nutrition 
Education Program, sponsored by the 
University Extension Service. Head- 
ing the program in the Oneida area 
is KAREN DUQUAIN PASTERSKI, 
a home economics major. Mrs. Paster- 
ski, along with approximately 28 pro- 
gram assistants, spend about 20 hours 
a week making home calls. Besides 
providing information on nutrition, 
they also give the homemaker tips on 
housekeeping, home management, food 
storage, guides for shopping, and, in 
general, how a homemaker can get 
the most for her money. 

JEROME E. JOHNSON of New 
Richmond has been commissioned a 
second lieutenant in the U.S. Air 
For'ce upon graduation from Officer 
Training School at Lackland AFB, 
Texas. He has been assigned to Webb 
AFB, Texas, for training as a pilot. 

'71 

SUSAN BECKER is currently 
teaching at Wyalusing Academy at 
Prairie ^ du Chien, a private academy 
for training vocational students who 
cannot measure up to the require- 
ments of high school credit courses. 
Miss Becker is teaching in the area 
of domestic training. 



Marriages 

'65 

CRYSTAL DBENGBBR6 (MS 68) 
to James Barnard, Feb. 13, in Stur- 
geon Bay. The bride is teaching at 
Gibraltar Area High School and Area 
13 Vocational School in Sturgeon Bay 
and Pish Creek. At home at Route 
No. 1, Sturgeon Bay. 

'67 

Marlene Kay Worms to CONRAD 
OERTWIG,, Nov. 12, 1970. The couple 
is living in Denver where the groom 
is manager of the home construction 
division of Denver Wood Products. 

Linda Marie Lascelle to TIMOTHY 
HILEBRAND, Jan, 9, in Milwaukee. 
The couple is residing at 4601 S. First 
St., Milwaukee. 

DIANE HERRHOLD to Loren Dale 
Marty, Dec. 19, 1970, in Wauwatosa. 
At home in Madison. 

PEGGY LYNN PICK to David Rea- 
son, Jan, 16, in Wauwatosa. She is 
currently employed as an assistant 
buyer with Marshall Field & Co. At 
home in Chicago. 

'68 

Janet Marie Barber to RICHARD 
EUGENE WHITE, Jan. 2, in Plum 
City. The groom is a graduate stu- 
dent at Stout. 



Stout Alumnus 



Page 11 



'69 

CARRIE ANN PATTERSON to 
RUSSELL BRUCE WURZ (BS 66), 
Jan. 30, in Racine. The groom is an 
industrial engineer at Oscar Mayer & 
Co., Madison, At home at 5916 An- 
thony Place, Madison. 

MARY LYNN SCHROLL to PETER 
MILLER SCHROEDER, Jan, 23, in 
New Richmond. The bride also re- 
ceived a degree in early childhood 
education in January, 1971. The 
groom, an industrial education major, 
will be graduated from Stout in Au- 
gust. At home at 1421^^ Stout Road, 
Menomonie. 

70 

DONNA MARIE ZIMDARS to 

Quentin Paul Neubauer, Feb. 20, in 
Sullivan. The couple resides at 1732 
Iowa Ave. E., St. Paul. 

PATRICIA ANN STOVEN to 
WILLIAM BRUCE BULL, Dec, 19, 
1970, at Fort Atkinson. At home at 
22 Healy Road, Fort Atkinson, where 
the groom teaches electronics in the 
senior high school. 

CHRISTIE A. THIELKE to PRANK 
BRAISKE IV (BS 71), Jan. 30, at 
Lakewood, The bride teaches home 
economics at White Lake High School 
and the groom is a teacher in Camp- 
bellsport. They reside at Lakewood. 

LINDA LEE ANDERSON to 
THOMAS G. NECKVATAL, Dec. 28, 
at White Bear Lake, Minn. She 
teaches home economics at Goodhue, 
Minn,, and he is currently serving in 
the U.S. Army at Port Bragg, N.C. 

SUSAN MARIE SIGGENS to 
Michael W. Riley, March, in New 
Richmond. She is assistant director 
of safety pi'ograms with the Ameri- 
can Red Cross, At home at 306 E. 
Hoyt Ave., St. Paul. 

CHERYL ANNE LARSON to 
JOHN EDWARD MALLO, recently, 
in Deer Park. The groom is currently 
serving in the U.S. Army, stationed 
in Fort Sill, Okla, 

KIRSTEN ANE HANSEN to 
MARK RICHARD VANDEN BRAN- 
DEN, Feb. 12, at Fairfax, Va. The 
groom is serving a tour of duty with 
the U.S. Array at Fort Belvoir, Va, 

BARBARA ANN CRAMER to 
LARRY LEE HELGASON, Feb. 13, 
in Marshfield. At home at 602 9th 
Ave., Rock Falls, HI,, where the 
groom teaches, 

'71 

Laurel M. Bartelt to JAMES R. 
BLAIR, Feb. 27, in Oshkosh, The 
couple will live in Rice Lake where 
the groom is on the teaching staff at 
the Rice Lake School for Vocational 
and Adult Education. 

CAROL JEAN MASBRUCH to 
William H. Hughes III, Ma'-. 6, in 
Platteville. At home at 912 E, Gorham 
St. in Madison. 

BEVERLY KAY ANDERSON to 
Keith Wayne Schultz, Jan, 30, in 
Sparta, At home in Las Vegas. 




'12 

JULIA MITCHELL MACNEILL, 
80, Route No. 1, Green Lake, Feb. 9, 
at Mercy Medical Center, Oshkosh. 
She was an administrator for the 
Visiting Nurses Association of Chi- 
cago and a housemother at Ripon 
College for 10 years. She is survived 
by two brothers. 

'15 

SOPHIA W. STERLING, Oct. 22, 
1969, at Oshkosh. 

'24 

VALLIE A. ELVERS, 66, Sept. 15, 
in Southfield. He was affiliated with 
the Detroit school system for 46 years, 
retiring from Redford High School in 
February, 1969. Survivors include 
his wife, two sons, a daughter, and 
three step-children. 

'25 

Mrs. Dorothy H. Burnham of Flint, 
Mich., informs us of the death of her 
husband, HARRY A. BURNHAM, Jan. 
10. Besides his wife, he is survived by 
a son and daughter. 

'33 

JOHN STEIMLE, 63, Feb. 2, at St. 
Louis Park, Minn., of a heart attack. 
He taught shop at. St. Louis Park 
High School for the past 25 yaars. 
Survived by his wife, Pearl. 

'34 

DOROTHY STEPP JOHNSTON, 
60, Route No, 5, Eau Claire, in Feb- 
ruary, She taught at Eau Claire High 
School and Chippewa Senior High 



until her retirement in 1957. She is 
survived by her husband, Willard 0. 

'47 

WALTER O. CAVE (MS 53), Mar. 
23, in Whitefish Bay, after a lingering 
illness. He was currently supervisor 
of trade and industry for the Mil- 
waukee school system and was a 
former industrial arts teacher at Lin- 
coln High School. Survived by his 
wife, Joyce; a son and two daughters. 



Carolyn Barnard Hemingway 
26, Silver Spring, Md., who 
had many friends on the Stout 
campus, died Feb, 27, of leu- 
kemia, at the National Insti- 
tute of Health, Bethesda, Md. 
She is survived by her hus- 
band, Bruce ; her father, David 
P. Barnard (BS 46, MS 47), 
dean of learning resources at 
Stout; her mother, Kathleen 
(BS 41, MS 67) ; a sister and 
two brothers. 



JOAN PROCKNOW KEUP, 31, Jan. 
31, at Elkhorn. She had been the 
home economics agent in Calumet 
County for 6 years before assuming 
the same position in Walworth Coun- 
ty two years ago. Survived by her 
husband, Albert. 

'65 

BETTE BEMBINSTER YOUNG, 
27, Jan. 23, in Virginia, Minn. She 
was employed by the University of 
Minnesota extension division as a 
home economist for St. Louis County. 
Survived by her husband. 




President Willinvi J. MicJieels haa roRiimcd Jiis ditties at the univuisi'i/ follotoing 
a leave of absence this winter. Mieheels used the leave to recover froin an 
eye O'peration he underiuent last year. A sign placed by students in front of the 
Administration Building luelcomed him back. 



Page 12 



Stout Alumnus 



Recreation 

Camping, hiking and canoeing 
aren't typical subjects taught in 
a university gym class, but 
they're an important part of a 
physical education course offered 
at Stout. The course, entitled 
"Outdoor Skills," consists of a 
variety of activities rangiiig 
from making your own tent to 
scaling the side of the university 
Fieldhouse. It is open to both 
men and women. 

"We try to get our students 
to know the wilderness and to 
respect it," said John Zuerlein, 
instructor for the course. He 
explained that the students are 
taught subjects associated with 
outdoor recreation such as camp- 
ing techniques, canoeing, basic 
cUmbing and hiking skills, camp 
cooking and outdoor observation. 
"I felt that we have such a 
variety of outdoor recreational 
resources but students don't use 
them to their fullest because 
they don't know how," Zuerlein 
said. "This course shows stu- 
dents how to appreciate and use 
available natural resources." 

Zuerlein's approach to the 
course involves more than just 
classroom instruction. For ex- 
ample, last fall students enrolled 
in the course packed off for a 
camping and canoeing trip up 
the Red Cedar River, north of 
Menomonie. Many of the tents 
used on the camping trip were 
made by the students from 
sheets of plastic, mosquito net- 
ting and tape. The students set 
up their own camp, cooked their 
own food and engaged in a var- 
iety of hiking and climbing ac- 
tivities. 

Zuerlein feels that activities 
such as these help students gain 







a greater appreciation for phy- 
sical fitness. "I want the stu- 
dents to know what fatigue is in 
the wilderness," he said. "This 
will show them the need for phy- 
sical fitness in outdoor activi- 
ties." 

Knowing your way around in 
the woods is an important part 
of outdoor recreation so Zuerlein 
gives his students lessons in 
finding directions and in survival 
techniques. A small wooded 
area outside Menomonie is used 
as a laboratory for this training. 

To help the students develop 
skills in climbing, Zuerlein has 



had membei's of his class lower- 
ing themselves from ropes 
stretched along the outside walls 
of the university Fieldhouse. 

Other activities have included 
camp-style cookouts on the uni- 
versity's football field. One 
group of students found them- 
selves cooking, supper in the 
pouring rain. "We try to simu- 
late the environment of the wil- 
derness," Zuei-lein explained. 

The half credit, for which the 
course is offered, helps satisfy 
part of the physical education 
work required by the university 
for graduation. 



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